21.8.04

Snowy Egret

photo: Glenn Baker

From the balcony of our office in Ozona we occasionally have the favor of a visit by a Snowy Egret, Egretta thula. A small, white heron, the Snowy Egret is the American counterpart to the very similar Old World Little Egret, which has established a foothold in the Bahamas.

Adults have a slim black bill and long black legs with yellow feet. Their eyes also yellow turn ruby red in breeding season. Adults have shaggy plumes much prized by the fashion industry. Once hunted nearly to extinction for their plumes the Snowy Egret has rebounded since being placed on the endangered species list in 1997.

Their breeding habitat is large inland wetlands and coastal wetlands from the lower Great Lakes and southwestern United States to South America. They nest in colonies, often with other waders, usually on platforms of sticks in trees or shrubs.

Snowy Egrets stalk their prey in shallow water, often running or shuffling their feet; they will also stand still and wait to ambush prey. They tend not to recognize their mates outside the nest and will challenge any visitor in the immediate area. For more information about attracting local animals to your backyard read "Wildlife."

Glenn Baker, a photographer and naturalist from Florida Joins our staff today. Glenn's photo 'Days of Thunder' was featured in our series on the endangered American Crocodile. He lives in Jacksonville and only recently began photographing animals while pursuing his interests in nature and particularly the fauna of his native Florida.

Glenn belongs to the Jacksonville Herpetology Society and spends as much time as he can camping and hiking local forests, tracking his subjects and perfecting the art of wildlife photography. Glenn says part of his success is anticipating animal behavior by observation, "trying to capture a moment few of us ever see, something out of the ordinary. Action is generally explosive... that catches you off guard." Alligators are his favorite subjects since, as a child he very nearly became a meal for one while on a trip with his family to Ocala National Forest.

Glenn's beautiful pictures tell volumes about his subjects and his respect for the animals. It's because of his determination and skill as a wildlife photographer that we are pleased to welcome him to the Animal Broadcast Network. We look foreword to future animal stories as seen through the lens of Glenn's camera.
__________________

You may see more of Glenn's Photos at ABN's Photo Archive
Comments: "
hi I am trying to get a hold of Glenn Baker so I can use his image for a publication. Can someone please forward my email to him?
thanks
Hebeluna@gmail.com
 
" Post a Comment


Links to this post:

Create a Link

1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

hi I am trying to get a hold of Glenn Baker so I can use his image for a publication. Can someone please forward my email to him?
thanks
Hebeluna@gmail.com

8:34 PM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Top of Page